Monsterliner
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Windshield chip repair

Discussion in 'Detailing' started by Flexin, Aug 15, 2014.

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  1. Flexin

    Flexin Admin Staff Member Founding Member Top Event

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    Messages:
    4,627
    Occupation:
    Truck Driver
    Location:
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    I found a chip in my windshield about a week after I bought it. Not sure if I some how missed it before I bought it or didn't hear it when the rock hit. Then, just over a week ago I got a bigger one from a bottom dump trailer while on the highway.

    I received training on doing the repairs in 2005 to do them and some other things. I still have the equipment but my resin was dried up. I have used it but it has been a while. To get the repairs done it would have been $70 for the first and $10 for the second one on that same windshield. Then there is one on my wife's car. So I decided to order new resins and do it myself.

    Today I received my products and a big duty charge. I knew that was coming. Just didn't know how much.

    Here is the smaller chip on the Jeep.


    DSC_1729 (Medium).JPG
    Here is the larger chip on the Jeep.

    DSC_1728 (Medium).JPG

    Here I am working on the wife's car.

    DSC_1736 (Medium) (2).JPG

    DSC_1738 (Medium).JPG

    Working on the small chip on the Jeep.
    DSC_1745 (Medium).JPG
    The small chip from inside the Jeep.

    DSC_1747 (Medium).JPG
    Curing the resin.

    DSC_1748 (Medium).JPG

    This is the larger chip done. The white area is the pit filler. That is filling the cavity from the impact area.

    DSC_1755 (Medium).JPG

    This is the small one finished. This one came out really nice. The impact damage was smaller and it didn't have the spider legs so it finished up much nicer.

    DSC_1749 (Medium).JPG
    So in the end I saved money doing it myself and have product that will allow me to fix many more. I can even go get my insurance again and start doing them again and detailing. Maybe when I get get a bigger house with a larger garage.

    James
     
  2. Rivethead

    Rivethead Active Member Founding Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2013
    Messages:
    260
    Excellent work and thanks for the write-up. Window chips are pretty unsightly, so a quick repair that doesn't involve replacing the entire windows is sweet indeed.
     
  3. Flexin

    Flexin Admin Staff Member Founding Member Top Event

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    Messages:
    4,627
    Occupation:
    Truck Driver
    Location:
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Thanks. The crazy thing is, my wife got another chip this year. I went to repair it and my battery was dead in my mini drill that came with the kit. I put it on to charge and sat down to watch something. I said it should have enough of a charge in to do the job. Went out a half hour later I go out to work in it and it was a full crack. It was about 10 inches long or so. I was so close to fixing it. Oh well, can't get them all.

    James
     
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